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COVID-19 has created a challenging environment for income reliant investors, with interest rates near all-time lows and expected to remain there for the foreseeable future, while in equity markets, even the most reliable dividend payers are facing mounting pressure on their dividend policies over...
Infrastukturinvestments zeichen sich durch hohe Erträge und niedrige Korrelationen aus. Zudem können sie Inflationsschutz bieten. Mehr erfahren.
Global Listed Infrastructure climbed in May as investors anticipated rising economic activity levels. March quarter earnings results were accompanied by generally positive outlook commentary. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index gained +4.2% during the month, while the MSCI World in...
Neues Investment Research, aktuelle Anlagestrategien, Meinungen, Marktkommentare und Updates der Investmentexperten von First State Investments.
Investment Management von erfahrenen Investmentexperten, das über verschiedene Anlageklassen klaren Grundsätzen und Überzeugungen folgt.
Mit einem First State Portfolio investieren Anleger in nachhaltige Infrastruktur. Das Management sucht nach überzeugenden Aktien, die ESG Kriterien erfüllen.
All of us have been brutally confronted by a new reality in the last few months. It has certainly been crude, with financial markets swinging around on a riptide of greed and fear, as we the participants have vacillated between elation and despair. It is not surprising. Life and the world of mark...
Risk assets fared well in April as investor sentiment was buoyed by the huge monetary and fiscal responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as signs that social distancing measures have been effective in slowing the spread of the virus and hopes that a vaccine could be developed by year-end.
Global Listed Infrastructure rallied in April as substantial government stimulus packages restored a measure of confidence to financial markets.
For infrastructure companies, looking after all stakeholders is a fundamental part of honouring their social license to operate. How companies behave, especially during challenging times, gives tremendous insight into their overall commitment to social responsibility.
Coronavirus has impacted every sector of the share market, but some stand to benefit where others have struggled. Find out how two listed infrastructure assets - towers and airports - compare for long term investors with Portfolio Manager Ed Leung.
Global Listed Infrastructure fell in March as lockdown measures and rising unemployment rates triggered market volatility.
Unlike the GFC, the global listed infrastructure sector has gone into the COVID-19 crisis with strong balance sheets and high debt serviceability. But while safe havens like utilities and mobile towers have held their ground in most markets, not all infrastructure has been immune to the impacts o...
Global Listed Infrastructure fell in February on concerns that the spread of COVID-19 could weigh more heavily on economic activity levels than initially anticipated.
Global Listed Infrastructure delivered steady gains through January as investors sought defensive assets.
Global Listed Infrastructure rallied in December against a background of positive macroeconomic news, including fresh progress in US-China trade talks and a conclusive UK general election result.
Global Listed Infrastructure dipped in November as hopes for rising economic growth saw investors shift into higher beta assets. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index fell -1.3%, while the MSCI World index^ ended the month +2.8% higher.
Global Listed Infrastructure delivered mixed returns in October as an uncertain economic backdrop was balanced by signs of progress for Brexit and US/China trade talks.
Over the last 11 years, carbon emissions from the US electricity sector have declined dramatically. This has been driven by (1) state based renewable energy targets (2) renewable and natural gas-fired generation becoming cheaper than coal and more recently, (3) investors’ behaviour – favouring co...
Japanese passenger rail volumes remain solid with the Rugby World Cup and Tokyo Olympics expected to provide continued support for the year ahead. Japan’s proposed 500km/h Maglev train between Tokyo and Osaka represents another example of the country’s world leading infrastructure.
Global Listed Infrastructure proved resilient during September against a backdrop of geopolitical tensions and softening economic data. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index gained +1.8%, while the MSCI World index ended the month +2.1% higher.
Global Listed Infrastructure added significant value to portfolios in August as investors sought more defensive exposure. Geopolitical uncertainty persisted while an inverted bond yield curve indicated a rising risk of recession. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index gained +0.9% while ...
Global Listed Infrastructure declined in September as a combination of rising interest rates, political interference and equity issuance dampened returns.
Global Listed Infrastructure delivered mixed returns as above-trend US GDP growth contrasted with EM volatility. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index fell by -0.3%, while global equities^ gained +2.2%.
Global Listed Infrastructure gained in July as earnings strength buoyed global markets and investors looked past ongoing trade tensions. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index ended the month +2.9% higher, while global equities gained +3.8%.
Over the last few years, valuations have generally become expensive in our universe of quality companies. Valuations reaching these levels remind me of the mistakes I made running into the 2008 crash. Whilst it is hard to predict a market turn like that, some of the signs look eerily similar (as ...
Global Listed Infrastructure shrugged off a backdrop of political and trade uncertainty and maintained its upward path in May. The Fund’s benchmark, the FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index ended the month +2.7% higher, while global equities¹ gained +4.2%.
We think US utility investment opportunities remain abundant, driven by modernisation, electric vehicles and economic wind generation.
The latest instalment of our Travel Diary series comes from Andrew Greenup, who recently spent time in Brazil visiting infrastructure companies, assets, regulators and government bodies.
The past decade has witnessed the birth of a new asset class: Global Listed Infrastructure Securities (GLIS). While investors have embraced infrastructure as an asset class since the 1990s, the idea of investing in infrastructure via listed securities was developed by a small number of Australian...
With Initial Public Offerings in India consistently oversubscribed and valuations peaking, the team discuss their five largest holdings and why now is not the time to sell.
It was John Templeton who famously skewered that old bull market hubris: “It’s different this time,” as the four most expensive words in the history of investment.
Infrastructure in the United States today feels like the opening line of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”.
Listed infrastructure gave up ground during the March quarter. Rising geopolitical tension, regulatory headwinds and higher bond yields weighed on most infrastructure sectors.
Global listed infrastructure gave up ground during the March quarter. Rising geopolitical tension, regulatory headwinds and higher bond yields weighed on most infrastructure sectors.
Global Listed Infrastructure fell during February against a backdrop of market volatility triggered by rising bond yields.
The slow pace of change in Japan and the meagre improvements made so far have been a difficult pill to swallow for Abenomics supporters.
Listed infrastructure has historically offered investors risk-adjusted returns and lower correlations to traditional asset classes. This outcome has been achieved by delivering steady out-performance of other asset classes during periods of equity market weakness.
Global Listed Infrastructure was broadly flat in July. An environment of geopolitical uncertainty and deteriorating economic growth was countered by falling interest rates and decent company results. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index ended the month 0.4% lower while the MSCI World i...
Global Listed Infrastructure gained in June, supported by increasingly dovish central bank rhetoric and persistently low bond yields. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index rose +4.2%, while the MSCI World index^ ended the month +6.6% higher.
Florida is home to world leading infrastructure companies. The US state offers investors exposure to strong demographics, pro-business politics and sensible regulation. Sunshine State is more than just a reference to the weather.
Global Listed Infrastructure rebounded in January, aided by well-received December quarter earnings. The FTSE Global Core Infrastructure 50/50 index gained +4.4%, in line with global equities^.
The North American railroad sector continues to undergo transformational change, but the execution is not without risk. These companies are overhauling what have been described as ‘dense spaghetti networks’. In this update Senior Analyst Jessica Johnson shares her insights following two weeks spe...
Listed infrastructure has offered investors attractive risk-adjusted returns and lower correlations to traditional asset classes. This outcome has been achieved by delivering steady outperformance during periods of equity market weakness.